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A DNA Test that tells you who you are.


The greatest pr trick that's ever been used (repetitively) is the who am I approach and remarkably its always quite effective. That's because, when an organization reaches out to its audience, it is in effect trying to connect its products and services to those individuals. In essence, the organization is saying, "we understand you" and therefore this product fits into your lifestyle, your story of who you are or who you want to be. Who doesn't want to be the fit upper middle-class runner who just bought an Iphone 7 and can now go run in the rain? In essence, the goal of such a campaign that uses the who am I method is to  offer you assistance to answering that very question. The answer is always a product or service.

So when the DNA Journey went viral on social media, you would expect that it was released by a company selling DNA test kits. You know, the Ancestry tests that allow you to find out if you're really German, English, Asian or what not. Since these have become available at a fairly reasonable price to the public in the last year, many people are finding out that their whole identity, who they believe they are (or have been told by relatives) is completely wrong. The question then becomes, why Momondo, a travel itinerary company for booking travel would want to use this phenomenon as the basis for their campaign?

Connecting ancestral locations with travel seems like a good idea and there's no doubt the campaign has been a huge success. There is, of course, a lack of connecting the company with their desired purpose directly in the video and a risk the audience may do the same. However, it's clear they didn't want to hard market to the audience the way Dove has with their videos, which often feel hypocritical. The well written script, simply asks the participants "Do you want to go on a journey?" The end of the video simply states "An open world begins with an open mind.", then provides a link to www.letsopenourworld.com which then spells it out for us, gives us data on the study and encourages us to, of course, travel. Brilliant? I think so. Not only does it entertain, educate and build a positive image for Momondo, but it builds back-links and develops the companies page-views into a travel website that may not have been known against larger competitors (Hotwire, Travelocity or Orbitz).

The only question I have is what happens when your racist uncle finds out the truth?


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